Wednesday, March 23, 2016

This Blog has Moved to Wordpress with New Name & Focus

It's rather evident that even though  3rd political party free of bias on critical topics and issues is sorely needed the Transpartisan Party is not yet ready to mature into a viable 3rd political party. The Independant (in Arizona) is growing in membership. I personally will remain a registered AZ Democrat and list myself as a "Progressive Democrat". With this in mind I have resurrected my "AZ Code Blue" initiative which calls out the AZ Democratic Party to push forward enough to gain a majority in the AZ House of Representatives for a change. I will leave this blog up so people who have it linked elseswhere will not get a broken link notice and hopefully will follow the discussion over at:
All older postings have beenm exported to the new site so there will remain for perpatuity and context in the future.

Thursday, March 3, 2016

Romney, McCain: Trump a danger for America's future

English: Governor Mitt Romney of MA
English: Governor Mitt Romney of MA (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — In an extraordinary display of Republican chaos, the party's most recent presidential nominees, Mitt Romney and John McCain, lambasted current front-runner Donald Trump on Thursday, calling him unfit for office and a danger for the nation and the GOP.
"His is not the temperament of a stable, thoughtful leader," Romney declared. He called Trump "a phony" who is "playing the American public for suckers," a man whose "imagination must not be married to real power."
Hours later, Trump lashed back, calling Romney "a choke artist" who lost to Barack Obama four years ago only because he was such a poor candidate.
The vicious feud marked a near-unprecedented scenario pitting the Republican Party's most prominent leaders, past and present, against each other as Democrats begin to unite around Hillary Clinton.
Romney, McCain: Trump a danger for America's future

Saturday, February 27, 2016

Transpartisanship and the Conversion of Political Conflict

The current presidential campaign exposes extreme partisanship as our political normality. Reminiscent of the classic "boiling frog" metaphor, what once seemed deplorable has gradually (and gravely) become our standard practice. As revealed by the Pew Research Center ("Political Polarization in the American Public: How Increasing Ideological Uniformity and Partisan Antipathy Affect Politics, Compromise and Everyday Life"), our civic temperature is methodically rising, perhaps beyond the boiling point, and the consequences are both serious and several. The study states:
"The overall share of Americans who express consistently conservative or consistently liberal opinions has doubled over the past two decades from 10% to 21%. [As a result], the center has gotten smaller: 39% of Americans currently take a roughly equal number of liberal and conservative positions, down from 49% in surveys conducted in 1994 and 2004."
In addition to the steady and significant growth in gross ideological polarization, the research also reveals a growing and alarming disdain for those with opposing political views. The findings assert:
"Partisan animosity has increased substantially... In each party, the share with a highly negative view of the opposing party has more than doubled since 1994. Most of these intense partisans believe the opposing party's policies 'are so misguided that they threaten the nation's well-being'."
As indicated by research (and frequently revealed in practice), it appears that far too many citizens have learned to accept such political polarization - and the personal loathing that accompanies it - as our destructive domestic custom. Our most accepted tactics to counter such dysfunction - known as "bipartisanship" and "non-partisanship" - have also proven to be mostly ineffective, thus leaving those in the center (both literally and politically) both distant and disengaged. The temperature of our hostile conflict continues to increase, and thus it increasingly appears that bipartisanship and non-partisanship have proven to be unsuccessful community coolants.

Thursday, February 6, 2014

Progressive Victories in 2013

Moyer preaches to the choir
Moyer preaches to the choir (Photo credit: Clyde Bentley)
15 Wins for the Progressive Movement in 2013 (via Moyers & Company)
In politics, as in sports, you can’t win ‘em all. With a divided government and a House of Representatives firmly in the control of tea partiers, it was a tough year for progressives in Washington – one marked by the painful cuts of sequestration…

Friday, June 22, 2012

Georgia Asks Employers to Rat Out Job Seekers Who Fail Drug Tests

Master Sgt. Urbano Sosa demonstrates the job o...
Master Sgt. Urbano Sosa demonstrates the job of an observer for a UPL collection exercise. As observer, maintaining a direct line of sight with a specimen bottle at all time helps to ensure a proper chain of custody and prevents tampering or altering of a specimen. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The state of Georgia has publicized a rule asking employers to tattle on unemployed job seekers who test positive for drug use when applying for work. The Georgia Department of Labor rule is the latest in a flurry of state programs that impose drug tests on safety net applicants and sanctions on those who fail the tests. The Georgia rule was prominently featured on the state’s Department of Labor’s website last week.*
As I wrote last month, the problem of jobless folks abusing drugs is a concocted one that works to stigmatize the safety net programs so that they can be undercut. In an interview with, the Georgia Department of Labor said it did not collect data on the number of people who have previously been booted off the jobless rolls for drug use. 
Drug testing policies have been all the rage among conservative legislators since the start of the recession. At least 30 states considered bills in the last year that would have had unemployment or welfare applicants peeing in a cup. 
In April, Georgia passed a law requiring all welfare applicants to take a drug test. A similar law passed by the Florida legislature last year was struck down as unconstitutional in a federal court, but Georgia lawmakers refused to heed the warnings and passed the law anyway. The welfare law will go into effect on July 1

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SB 1070: High court has already decided, but process maintains suspense

Minneapolis protest against Arizona immigrant ...
Minneapolis protest against Arizona immigrant law SB 1070 (Photo credit: Fibonacci Blue)

The U.S. Supreme Court might issue its opinion on Arizona's controversial immigration law, Senate Bill 1070, as early as Monday. Or next Thursday. Or, heck, maybe sometime in July.

Despite what you may have heard, nobody knows for sure.

So, as they have for weeks, folks with a stake or keen interest in the ruling -- politicians, immigration advocates and, yes, journalists -- will fire up their computers at exactly 7 a.m. Arizona time to see if today's the day.

So what's the holdup?
But here's the thing: The Supreme Court already has decided the case, and they likely did so two months ago.

There's plenty of politics involved in writing, negotiating and tweaking that opinion. And while nobody -- or at least nobody willing to talk openly -- knows what's happening with the SB 1070 case behind the Supreme Court's closed doors, we do have a general understanding of the justices' process.

Read more:

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